Health Guides: Healing Foods

Related Articles

Most of you have probably heard about Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV), however, did you know that it has been used for many hundreds, if not thousands of years. In fact, Hippocrates (the father of medicine) used AVC back in around 400 B.C. for its health giving qualities.
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Licorice has a rich and ancient history of use as a medicine, being rooted in Indian, Chinese, Greek and Egyptian traditions, alike. Technically a legume, related to beans and peas, its sweetness results from the presence of glycyrrhizin, a compound 30-50 times sweeter than sugar. This compound is what gave licorice its name, which derives from the Greek word γλυκύρριζα (glukurrhiza), meaning "sweet” (gluku) "root" (rrhiza)
Written by Heidi Stevenson
The benefits of grape seed extract in cancer are well documented, but modern medicine won't do anything with it until the mechanism of action has been found, so that it can be isolated, purified, made poisonous and owned by a single company for enormous profits
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Beets have always been and remain one of the world's most underutilized 'super foods' with powerful, evidence-based health benefits
When you know you're in for a stressful day, snacking on a few walnuts may be just the thing to help you handle the pressure
The diet food industry had great hopes for the idea of low-fat potato chips as a weight loss aid. But it turns out that the artificial fat substitutes used in low-fat foods may actually lead to weight gain and obesity
Written by Sayer Ji, Founder
Avocados have a relatively high level of fat for a 'vegetable.' But does this mean they are unhealthy to the heart as many assume? New research reveals the opposite is true and avocados are extremely heart-friendly
Good news for the holiday season! Champagne does more than tickle your nose. It may also protect your heart
If you live in North America or Europe that jar of "cinnamon" in your cupboard is probably not truly cinnamon at all, but a very similar spice known as cassia or "bastard cinnamon."
We all know that leafy green vegetables are good for us, but do you know why they're so good? There are plenty of reasons but, when it comes to heart health, the secret may be nitrates and chlorophyll

Print Options


This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2020 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.