Abstract Title:

Ursolic Acid Inhibits the Proliferation of Gastric Cancer Cells by Targeting miR-133a.

Abstract Source:

Oncol Res. 2015 ;22(5):267-73. PMID: 26629938

Abstract Author(s):

Fenfen Xiang, Chunying Pan, Qianqian Kong, Rong Wu, Jiemin Jiang, Yueping Zhan, Jian Xu, Xingang Gu, Xiangdong Kang

Article Affiliation:

Fenfen Xiang

Abstract:

Ursolic acid (UA), a potential chemotherapeutic agent, has the properties of inhibition of the growth of many human cancer cell lines. Whether UA can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, it was found that UA inhibited the growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Our results showed the increase of the percent of apoptotic cells and G1 phase, the inhibition of cell migrations well as the decrease of the expression of Bax, caspase 3 and Bcl-2 in BGC-823 cells after the treatment with UA. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that UA treatment upregulated the level of miR-133a in BGC-823 cells. Overexpression of miR-133a increased the G1 phase of cell cycle and decreased Akt1 expression in BGC-823 cells. These outcomes might be secondary to the increased expression of miR-133a after the treatment with UA.

Study Type : In Vitro Study

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